HOF 2018: Thome Impact Player, But Lack of World Championship Haunts Him

(Editor's note: Jim Thome will join Chipper Jones, Vladimir Guerrero, Trevor Hoffman, Jack Morris and Alan Trammel will be inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame on Sunday, July 29. InsideTheSeams.com will take a look at the career of each of them over the next six days. Today: Jim Thome).

For all the accomplishments of Jim Thome on the baseball field, what those who have known him over the years will remember the most has nothing to do with the National Pastime.

“He is the nicest, gentlest, kindest guy you will ever meet, to everything except the baseball,” explained former big-league player Mike Cuddyer, who himself embodied everything he said about Thome.

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And as good of a person Thome is, however, he did distinguish himself on the baseball field, too.

Next weekend, Thome will be one of six former players inducted into the Hall of Fame in Cooperstown, one of only 54 players to have been inducted in his first year of eligibility.

He will be inducted on Sunday along with Chipper Jones, Trevor Hoffman and Vladimir Guerrero, who also received the 75 percent of the votes required from veteran members of the Baseball Writers Association of America, along with Jack Morris and Alan Trammell, who came up short over the years in the BBWAA voting, but were elected last December by the Modern Day Committee.

Humble as he may be, even Thome admits being elected to the Hall of Fame is pretty special.

“It’s every kid’s dream to play in the major leagues,” he said, “but to be inducted in the Hall of Fame. …”

He doesn’t need to finish the sentence.

“When you get elected into the Hall of Fame and see the joy and excitement of what it brings to your family, friends and your coaches, all those great managers I played for,” said Thome. “I don’t want to say my life has changed too much. I try to keep that pretty simple, but it’s been very special to share this with the ones you really care about, and the people that are genuinely good fans that are happy for you. That means so much.”

Thome’s big-league career spanned 24 years, the bulk of 13 of which were spent with the Cleveland Indians. He also played with the White Sox, Twins, Orioles, Phillies and Dodgers.

Now he’s part of a team of baseball greats, based in Cooperstown, N.Y.

“How do you ever envision that?” said Thome. “As you are playing you don’t play to make it to the Hall of Fame. You play to be a guy who helps you club win. Then, the career is over, and you look back and have somebody said you are one of 54 (players elected to the Hall of Fame in the first year of legibility). There’s something special about that. You hold your chest out a little more.”

But there remains an empty feeling, Thome admits.

He ever earned a world championship ring. He never got to celebrate with champagne after the final game of the entire baseball season.  Twice, he was on an Indians team that advanced to the World Series, but in 1995 the Indians lost to the Braves in six games, and two years later, they were seven-game victims of the Marlins.

“It’s very heartbreaking, I have to tell you,” he said. “A day like today is special, but I can only envision what it would have been like to win a World Series.”

Winning a World Series, after all, is a team thing, and Thome was a team player, who in the process put together the type of numbers that made him stick out as one of the greatest to ever play the game.

Thome, along with Babe Ruth, Mel Ott, Carl Yastrzemski, Ted Williams and Barry Bonds are the only players in history to have 1,7000 walks and 1,699 RBI. He holds the MLB record with 13 walk-off home runs.

Thome, Bonds, Ruth, Williams, Manny Ramirez, Frank Thomas, Jimmie Foxx and Mickey Mantle are the only players in history to have hit 500 home runs, and compiled a .550 slugging percentage and .500 on-base percentage.

He ranks 23d all-time in extra-base hits, 26th in RBI, 41st in total bases, 51st in runs scored, 18th in OPS, 22nd in slugging percentage, and 44th in offensive WAR.

All the numbers add up to quite an accomplishment, but they are personal, and that isn’t Thome.

“This is special,” he said, “but I can only envision what it would have been like to win a World Series.”

The Thome Files

Year Team G AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI BB SO AVG SLG OPS
1991 Cle 27 98 7 25 4 2 1 9 5 16 .255 .367 .665
1992 Cle 40 117 8 24 3 1 2 12 10 34 .205 .299 .574
1993 Cle 47 154 28 41 11 0 7 22 29 36 .266 .474 .859
1994 Cle 98 321 58 86 20 1 20 52 46 84 .268 .523 .882
1995 Cle 137 452 92 142 29 3 25 73 97 113 .314 .558 .996
1996 Cle 151 505 122 157 28 5 38 116 123 141 .311 .612 1.062
1997 Cle 147 496 104 142 25 0 40 102 120 146 .286 .579 1.001
1998 Cle 123 440 89 129 34 2 30 85 89 141 .293 .584 .997
1999 Cle 146 494 101 137 27 2 33 108 127 171 .277 .540 .967
2000 Cle 158 557 106 150 33 1 37 106 118 171 .269 .531 .929
2001 Cle 156 526 101 153 26 1 49 124 111 185 .291 .624 1.040
2002 Cle 147 480 101 146 19 2 52 118 122 139 .304 .677 1.122
2003 Phi 159 578 111 154 30 3 47 131 111 182 .266 .573 .958
2004 Phi 143 508 97 139 28 1 42 105 104 144 .274 .581 .977
2005 Phi 59 193 26 40 7 0 7 30 45 59 .207 .352 .712
2006 CWS 143 490 108 141 26 0 42 109 107 147 .288 .598 1.014
2007 CWS 130 432 79 119 19 0 35 96 95 134 .275 .563 .973
2008 CWS 149 503 93 123 28 0 34 90 91 147 .245 .503 .865
2009 CWS 107 345 55 86 15 0 23 74 69 116 .249 .493 .864
2009 LAD 17 17 0 4 0 0 0 3 0 7 .235 .235 .471
TOTAL 124 362 55 90 15 0 23 77 69 123 .249 .481 .847
2010 Min 108 276 48 78 16 2 25 59 60 82 .283 .627 1.039
2011 Min 71 206 21 50 12 0 12 40 35 69 .243 .476 .827
2011 Cle 22 71 11 21 4 0 3 10 11 23 .296 .479 .869
TOTAL 93 277 32 71 16 0 15 50 46 92 .256 .477 .838
2012 Phi 30 62 9 15 2 0 5 15 8 21 .242 .516 .854
2012 Bal 28 101 8 26 5 0 3 10 14 40 .257 .396 .744
TOTAL 58 163 17 41 7 0 8 25 22 61 .252 .442 .786
Totals 2543 8422 1583 2328 451 26 612 1699 1747 2548 .276 .554 .956
Tracy RingolsbyComment